Friday, January 25, 2013

Garden Fence Block Tutorial

The original tutorial for this block, which can be found at Hyacinth Quilt Designs, was chosen as the February block for Hive #1 of Newbee Quilters. The original creates a 10" finished block.  Since my mother's the queen this month (don't let it go to your head woman, it's just for the month!!  ;) when she stated she wanted a 12" block, I did what any good daughter would *snicker* and told her I'd figure out the sizes and write up a tutorial for her to use.

One thing I'll say before I get started, she wants variety. Her color requests are green and purple with the white ....accent parts. Anyway, just because I've used purple in the middle and green around the edges doesn't mean you have to! My hope is some of you change it around and others do it this way. :)

Let's get started shall we?!

Supplies:
You'll need one purple and one green fabric (fabrics A and B) and white.

Cut the following:
      From Fabric A:
           1 - 5.5" square

      From Fabric B:
           4 - 3" x 3.5" rectangles
           4 - 3" x 6" rectangles

      From the White:
           2 - 1.5" x 5.5" rectangles
           2 - 1.5" x 7.5" rectangles
           4 - 1.5" x 3" rectangles

cutting gf


Tip: When working with a new block design, I find it easiest to lay out the block. This ensures I don't sew things together incorrectly. ;) This block is no exception. There are short rectangles and longer rectangles for both the white accents and the outer color border. Look at the following photo closely and lay out the rectangles as marked. (It won't ruin the block if the rectangles are swapped, but it looks nicer when it's consistent.)

layout gf
Short borders and white accent strips on the sides, longer ones on the top and bottom.

As always sew all seams with a scant 1/4". I press all seams open. If you press to one side, press the seams toward the darker fabric.

Sew the two 1.5 x 5.5 white rectangles to the right and left side of the center square. Set and press seams.

sides


Then sew the two 1.5 x 7.5 white rectangles to the top and bottom of the center square.

sew strips


Set and press your seams, then trim/square up block if necessary. It should measure 7.5" square at this point.

center


Sew each of the 4 - 1.5 x 3 white rectangles between the corresponding Fabric B outer borders, both sides and top/bottom. Set and press all seams.

sew together your strips


Sew the shorter border pieces to the right and left of the center square. Set and press seams.
Sew the longer borders to the top and bottom of the center square. Set and press seams.

At this point, I always turn my block right side up and give it a good final pressing.

finished
Don't mind the magnets, they're just holding the block in place. 


Trim and square up to 12.5" if necessary. You're finished!

Great job!! Stand back and admire your block. :)




*Disclaimer: I did this tutorial to help my hivemates with their bee blocks, along with anyone else that may want to make these blocks. While the tutorial is my own work, the design is not. If this block is your original design, please email me so that I may either give you credit or remove the post, at your request.*

16 comments:

  1. Good tutorial. Pretty too! I'll get working on one.

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  2. Love, love, love and also love I now have this block resized for future use thank you Angela!!

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  3. Hey, I like this one also! Thanks for the tutorial Angela, I think I'll make it even though I'm the other hive :-)!

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    Replies
    1. It's a great block with a lot of possibilities! Real fun and goes together quickly.

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  4. Angela, this is an easy to follow tutorial. I love how you make things look so easy! Thanks!
    Rebecca smith

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  5. Thanks - my granddaughter would like the 12 instead of 10 blocks. Very much appreciate your doing the math!

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    Replies
    1. Happy to help! Good luck with your granddaughter's quilt. :)

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  8. I made a wedding quilt for #4 son and DIL, using this pattern which she chose from a Pinterest pic.
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